DID I MENTION IT’S BEEN COLD LATELY?

What with the flood at the refuge and generally boggy weather, I’ve taken an interest in wildlife habitats a little closer to home. I’ve discovered that Greenway Park in Beaverton is a really active place for wildlife, even beaver.

The other day on the way to an appointment I spotted several, shall I say, water-features on my way. They are creeks and ponds adjacent to streets. So on the way back I made brief stops to check them out. You’ll notice they’re mostly ice-covered.

BRONSON CREEK
BRONSON CREEK

Off Cornell and 135th Ave. Actually, it’s one of three sizable ponds in a chain I later discovered from looking on Google maps. It looks like a good place for passerine birds and I’ll check again. This is on private property so I had to scamper down to take a picture while thinking about the tresspass warning sign I passed. It said the sheriff would be called!

WILLOW REEK
WILLOW  CREEK

One of many north/south-running creeks in the watershed. Most are pretty inconspicuous, but the rain had brought this one up to good visibility where it passed under Walker Road.

NIKE LAGOON

NIKE LAGOON

For years, there has been a sizable wetland on the south side of the Nike campus. It’s really evident right now. But in the background, you can see just two of the many cranes (not the bird kind) working on a major expansion. This is just a piece that, so far, remains untouched.

Eventually, they’ll probably use this too. But wouldn’t it be cool if they’d keep it as a wetland and as a place for their employees to learn about birds and other things? I probably could get some naturalists from TRNWR to show them a few things.

There’s a new high school being built only a few miles from the refuge. The school got a waiver from the county to convert three acres of wetlands on the property into an athletic field. Some people protested but it happened anyway. (I guess they didn’t bring guns.)

To me, it would have been a better thing to keep the wetlands and use it as a lab for teaching the high schoolers about nature, conservation, and sustaining habitats. But we’re still in the grip of 20th-century thinking and not ready, evidently, to prepare kids for the challenges faced by humanity in the current one.

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